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miscellaneous:hackrack

Hack Rack


“Heavy” Hack Rack (on left) and “Regular” Hack Rack (on right)

General info

The “Hack Rack” consists of a bunch of shelves where members can put things they don't need, but think others might find useful. It was in the Lab at Chase, then it moved to the 3-D Printing Lab at Lenox, and now it consumes the whole north wall of the East Room. You might find an old DVD player, switches, motors, power supplies, strong magnets, or, well, pretty much anything. It's all up for grabs. See something you like? Grab it! It's there because no one had a use for it. If you can use it, please do. :)

There is one rule

If you leave something on the Hack Rack, you should take something of equal volume off.

Hack Rack Notes

Brant's observations/thoughts:

  1. Basic organization
“Heavy” Hack Rack
Misc. Bearings/gears Flex duct/mower motor
Gears Wire/cables Wire/cables
Tires/wheels Pumps/motors Pumps/motors
“Regular” Hack Rack
1. AC&DC wall packs 2. Computer parts & input devices 3. PCBs & misc. cards 4. Cases & enclsoures
5. Motors & steppers 6. Controls, drives, relays 7. Pneumatics & hydraulics
8. Power & transformers 9. Consumer elec. & cameras 10. Wheels, gears, tires
  1. Storage containers
    1. Cardboard boxes
      1. These don't last, they fall apart very easily
      2. Shouldn't be used on the Hack Rack
    2. Plastic tubs/bins
      1. Rubberized bins seem to work OK, but don't count on ever seeing the lids again
      2. Clear plastic tubs seem to be too brittle and crack/fall apart
    3. Attached Top Containers
      1. Very durable
      2. Large volume means they can get heavy quick
      3. Hard to move or sort through if stacked
      4. Watch the weight with motors or transformers
    4. Milk crates
      1. These seem to do OK
      2. Wires, dowels, rods, and small pieces often fall through the holes
    5. 5 gallon buckets
      1. These seem to be the best out of everything so far
      2. Small volume keeps them from getting too heavy
      3. Contains stuff large and small pretty easily
      4. Cheap
      5. Easy to move around, handles
      6. Height makes more use of space on shelving than low tubs/bins
      7. I'd prefer to see these used more often (Brant)
  2. Adding stuff
    1. Heavy stuff should go on the bottom
    2. Lighter stuff on top
    3. Things I don't think we need (Brant)
      1. Tube TVs (they just sit around, it costs us money to dispose properly)
      2. Tube computer monitors (see above)
      3. Microwaves (we always seem to have one or two, very rarely used)
      4. Inkjet and laser printers (very common)
      5. Non-functioning kitchen/health/beauty appliances (coffee makers, curling irons, hair dryers, can openers)
      6. Computer or boombox speakers
      7. Office phones
      8. Desktop PCs and laptops
      9. Bubble wrap, foam, or packing material (it just sits around)
      10. Gas engines, lawn equipment, weed whackers, snow blowers
      11. Large tanks or vessels (ask others before dumping on rack)
    4. Useful things (Brant)
      1. Small to large motors
      2. Motor controllers and motor drives (1 or 3-phase power)
      3. Industrial controls, pushbuttons, switches, keyswitches
      4. Lights, strobes
      5. Buzzers, sirens, loudspeakers, megaphones
      6. Car or home audio speakers
      7. Cell phones
      8. LCD monitors
      9. LCD/plasma TVs
      10. Wall warts/AC-DC wall transformers
      11. Old power tools
      12. Transformers, rectifiers, large capacitors, other high voltage gear
      13. Project enclosures, boxes, metal containers
  3. Overflow/too much junk
    1. Nothing should be stored in front of the shelves or in the aisle
    2. “KEEP CLEAR” painted on the floor, words should always be visible
    3. Recycle scrap metal, computers, and circuit boards in the large cardboard crate
    4. Put any aluminum in the forge area so people can use it for casting
    5. Attend a “Scrap-to-Cash Recycling Class” with Tom Gz.
    6. Depending on the components, some stuff can be thrown in the dumpster as needed
    7. Watch for lead, mercury, or other toxic materials that must be properly disposed of
miscellaneous/hackrack.txt · Last modified: 2014/07/20 23:23 by branth